White Paper

May 16, 2016 White Paper

IoT and Video Surveillance

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The market of video surveillance is growing fast and is continually adapting and changing to the latest trends. Security and surveillance industry incorporate a large variety of products starting from the simple home monitoring systems, to motion-detection cameras, biometric recognition techniques and apparatus. Despite the fact that some of these solutions include a fixed-line connectivity, we can’t ignore the expansion of wireless equipments and the diffusion of IP cameras in the market. Besides, with the data aggregation and analysis, its access on different platforms and devices, we begin to walk on the immense terrene of the Internet of Things (IoT). In 2013, Analysys Manson predicted that the number of security and surveillance IoT devices connections worldwide will grow from 28 million in 2012 to 170 million in 2021 at a compound-annual- growth-rate of 22%. Furthermore, Verizon estimated that the number IoT connections in the manufacturing sector will grow 204% starting from 2015 to 2025. The question no longer relies on if IoT will affect the market or not, but how should manufacturers and developers prepare for it since it cannot be ignored even with its potential pros and cons.

Before we go into more detail about the future of video surveillance and IoT, a brief description of what is IoT should be made. There are plenty of definitions and some controversy about what is IoT exactly, but every definition wraps around its unique addressability of things. Basically the IoT can be characterized as the ability of on/off connecting every device to the internet (and/or to another device), which means anything that can be connected will be. For instance, a person may choose to connect the alarm clock to his/hers coffee maker so it starts to work before the person wakes up. Endless opportunities for different connections will take place. According to Forbes, the IoT is already happening and spreading across the market at a fast pace. Manufactures and entrepreneurs should prepare solutions to solve some of the arriving issues associated with the IoT: data and network/cyber security and how to store, analyze, protect and track all the massive data that these devices will produce.

In the video and physical security industry, security protection is a very abstruse concern and a very demanding issue to address. With the rising of cyber attacks and the imminent need of interoperability among devices, a security leak is unacceptable, since protecting people, their assets (and their privacy) is the main goal of the surveillance industry. Avigilon denoted that in this particular field, IoT is mainly about integrating high-definition video, with video analytics and access control. Protocols such as ONVIF were created to increase the usability among different devices without sacrificing functionalities, and conjointly with IP cameras and IP-based security, there’s an evident need to establish and create a baseline standards to allow security devices to work smoothly between them. Therefore, manufacturers need to work together to comply and to reshape their devices to embrace the impending market of IoT. As noted before, companies also should take into account that devices will generate a massive amount of data and the preparation for it is needed. Computer networking companies such as Cisco are already adapting themselves to the market, offering some software solutions for video surveillance and the IoT. Cloud services will also be one of the major influentials on this market, since they will provide data storage and management.

Whether manufactures fight it or not, IoT will become part of the video surveillance market, and interoperability among devices will have a tremendous impact on the consumer’s choice. Several standards should be outlined as the manufactures and cyber security is a requirement to be fulfilled. As for now, regular updates and strong password protection are ones of the possible solutions to this arising issue, which may minimize vulnerabilities associated to IoT.

Prepared by Ana Rodrigues

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Office in London, UK
Office in Kaunas, LT
Office in London, UK
Office in Kaunas, LT

Office in Kaunas, LT

Donelaičio g. 62, Kaunas, 50000

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Office in London, UK

45 King William Street, London, EC4R 9AN

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